Simplicity is the Key

You might already know of the brightly coloured, often symmetrical floor patterns called Rangoli, made by Hindus during the Festival of Lights – Diwali. It is believed that these beautiful patterns encourage and welcome the Goddess of Wealth – Lakshmi, to enter their homes and bless them with Her presence on this auspicious occasion.

Customary materials used to create Rangoli are flowers, coloured flour, lentils, pulses and food colour, all of which are readily available.

Even more basic than these materials is the next – sand.

Ilana Yahav’s expression of emotions through the shifting of sand is utterly mesmerizing. She uses just her fingers empowered by her soul to portray a vast range of human emotions and feelings in her creations.

But wait. There’s more…

I came across one other artist – Huang ZhuLin –  who paints on water, using Chinese Ink.

 

Evidently, creativity knows no bounds. It flows from within.

When you are artistic at heart, you don’t need to go out and buy expensive materials to produce a piece of art. Some of the most exquisite art can be produced using the most basic and natural materials at hand.

Giriama Jazzed

In the next few weeks, the opportunity to take this new fascination a step further arose, and excited as I was, I took it up and decided to explore it for myself, all in the name of a high school art project. Coincidentally, I was recycling a couple of ideas that I had touched upon, earlier in the course. I was already looking at African art and how the human figure was such an important aspect of it. With that came the notion of shape and form, which I was going to represent using different waste or otherwise recyclable materials.

Consumed by imagination, equipped with a few tools and backed with research, I came up with the idea of creating  contrast and comparison between two musical bands – A Giriama (local tribe) band versus an African American Jazz band. During research I came across the ‘African Drums Painting’ and really liked the idea of the exaggerated shape of the human form. This style of art brought such amazing energy and flow into the painting.

Some of the materials I used were: nuts, washers, binding wire, solder wire, soda cans, sisal rope and dried banana fibres.

Here, have a look at what I was able to create:

Giriama band

Giriama band

The Xylophonist

The Xylophonist

The Dancing lady

The Dancing lady

Soda cans (drums) wrapped in painted sisal rope

Soda cans (drums) wrapped in painted sisal rope

The Cellist and Pianist

The Cellist and Pianist

The Drummer

The Drummer

The Saxophonist

The Saxophonist